Practical Experience Requirement (PER)

To Complete PER, You Will Be Required To Achieve 15 Months Of Supervised Experience. This Should Be In A Relevant Computer Science Or IT Role

You will record your progress online within MyExperience in ACCS Account and have your PER signed off by your practical experience supervisor.

Find Out More About Practical Experience Requirement

15 Months Experience

What Is A Relevant Role?

Preferably, this means that you have a job where your time is spent on activities and tasks that are Computer Science, IT-related, or in other related technical areas such as Software Engineering and Data Science.
Experience can be gained before registering with ACCS while studying for the exams or taking the exams. However, You will be required to get this prior experience signed off by a practical experience manager or supervisor at the employer where you gained the experience.

Where can I work?

ACCS trainees can work in any sector and organization size – you do not have to work for an ACCS Approved Employer.
Your experience does not have to be gained in a single role or one continuous period, and you may also gain your experience in different roles with more than one number of employers. You also have a choice to gain experience by doing voluntary work for charities, associations, or clubs.
It is essential to look for opportunities to help you meet your PER and obtain a total of 15 months of experience in a relevant role or role. It is also essential that your work is appropriately supervised and that your practical experience supervisor signs off the time you complete towards your 15 months’ experience.

You can gain experience working part-time or in a role where your job includes only some IT and TECH work. 

When you record your employment details online in your ACCS account under “MyExperience,” you will be required to provide details about your role, including the number of hours you work and the percentage of your time spent on IT or TECH-related tasks. The online tool uses this information to calculate the amount of time you can count towards the 15 months requirement.

For instance, if you only spend 50% of your working time on TECH-related tasks, you are still eligible to use this experience towards your PER; you will accrue time more slowly. So in this example, you would gain three months PER in six months.

PER is based on the time you are gaining relevant work experience – not just the time you are in paid employment. So if you are taking a prolonged break from work but will be returning at some point in the future (for instance, taking time off to care for a relative, maternity leave, if you are furloughed/off work due to COVID-19), or any other long-term illness, you cannot count this time towards your 15 months.
You should add an end date to your role and can add a new role with a new start date when you begin working again.

It is essential to ensure that your PER record is updated and that your practical experience supervisor has signed off any performance objectives or time you have achieved when you change roles. “My Experience” will prompt you to get your time signed off when you indicate you are leaving a role or when you reach 15 months in total. You will then be required to achieve the remainder of your time and all the remaining performance objectives in your new role.

If you are somehow not employed in a relevant TECH-related role, you should still update the “My Experience” part of your online ACCS account to record your employment details. The time you spend in this role will not count towards your 15 months’ relevant experience; however, if a suitably qualified person supervises your work, then you may be able to achieve the following performance objectives while working in this role:
1: Stakeholder relationship management
2: Strategy and innovation
3: Leadership and management

If you choose to work for an ACCS Approved Employer, you will still be required to complete a minimum of 15 months in a relevant role.
You will still need to use the “My Experience” part of your online ACCS account to record your employment information to let ACCS know that your role is with an Approved Employer.

Practical experience supervisors

Practical Experience Managers or Supervisors Play An Important Role For Your PER. Also Supervising Your Experience, They Are Also Responsible For Signing Off Your Practical Achievement.

A practical experience Manager or supervisor is an individual who helps your development in the workplace and reviews your performance and progress and at work.
By choosing the right person to help you with the PER is a vital part of the process.

What Does A PER Supervisor Do?

Your practical experience manager or supervisor shall guide and help you by:

  • assisting you to spot the performance objectives you must aim to achieve.
  • Supporting you by setting performance timescales and targets. 
  •  Supporting your development, for instance, arranging job rotations, project work, or other opportunities for you to gain relevant experience
  • providing access to appropriate work experience
  • evaluating and reviewing your progress regularly
  • signing off the performance objectives you have achieved
  • signing off the time in a relevant role you are claiming towards the 15 months requirement.

Your supervisor must have the knowledge and experience to support you. They are responsible for verifying you have met the practical experience requirement – so they must have the expertise to do this.

Who Can Become Your PER Manager or Supervisor?

As to be seen mostly, PER manager or supervisor is the line manager or the person whom an affiliate reports to, specifically on particular activities or projects.

To sign off your performance objectives, your (PER) supervisor must be someone who:

  • Must be a qualified Computer Science Professional*
  • works closely with you
  • knows your work.

If your line manager is not CS qualified, they can still sign off your time in a relevant role, and you will need to nominate an additional qualified supervisor to sign off your objectives. The additional supervisor could be another manager within the organization, a consultant, or the organization’s external IT Professional who will work with your line manager to validate your practical experience.

Who Can Become Your PER Manager or Supervisor?

As to be seen mostly, PER manager or supervisor is the line manager or the person whom an affiliate reports to, specifically on particular activities or projects.

To sign off your performance objectives, your (PER) supervisor must be someone who:

  • Must be a qualified Computer Science Professional*
  • works closely with you
  • knows your work.

If your line manager is not CS qualified, they can still sign off your time in a relevant role, and you will need to nominate an additional qualified supervisor to sign off your objectives. The additional supervisor could be another manager within the organization, a consultant, or the organization’s external IT Professional who will work with your line manager to validate your practical experience.

More than one Practical Experience Supervisors

You may have multiple supervisors over a period – who are responsible for helping you achieve different performance targets and objectives.

Family And Friends

When possible, you should not have a friend or relative as your practical experience supervisor to avoid any potential conflicts of interest. Furthermore, when this is not possible, you need to disclose the relationship to ACCS when applying for admission to membership.

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Career Options After ACCS

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ACCS Qualification Is Recognized Worldwide

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